Ethical framework

The ethical standards expected of those who hold public office are summed up in seven principles, known as the ‘Nolan principles’.

Your Police, Fire and Crime Commissioner, Chief Constable and Independent Audit Committee are all committed to working to these, which are set out below:

Selflessness

Holders of public office should act only in the public interest. They should not do so in order to gain financial or other benefits for themselves, their family or their friends.

Integrity

Holders of public office should not place themselves under any financial or other obligations to any individuals or organisations that might want to influence how they perform their official duties.

Objectivity

In carrying out public business, including making public appointments, awarding contracts, or recommending individuals for rewards and benefits, holders of public office should decide on merit only.

Accountability

Holders of public office are accountable to the public for their decisions and actions and must cooperate with all appropriate scrutiny.

Openness

Holders of public office should be as open as possible about all the decisions and actions they take. They should explain all decisions and withhold information only where it is clearly in the wider public interest.

Honesty

Holders of public office must declare any private interests relating to their public duties and resolve any conflicts in a way that protects the public interest.

Leadership

Holders of public office should demonstrate these principles in their own behaviour. They should actively promote and robustly support the principles and be willing to challenge poor behaviour wherever it occurs.

Further information on the principles can be found on the Standards in Public Life website.

Statement by North Yorkshire Police and Crime Commissioner, Julia Mulligan, on the Nolan principles

I will abide by the seven standards that make up the ethical framework on public office, which allows transparency in all areas of my work as a Police and Crime Commissioner. These include my work locally and when representing my communities in national forums. I have included relevant case studies with the codes below to demonstrate how I am giving the public a voice on policing in North Yorkshire.

Selflessness

Commissioners should take decisions solely in the public interest. They should not do so for financial gain or other benefits for themselves, their family, or their friends.

Any gifts and hospitality accepted are fully reported on my website in a clear spreadsheet, so that everyone is fully aware of any gifts and engagements I attend. This makes the process open and transparent and avoids any misrepresentation.

This log is continually updated by my office, and scrutinised by the monitoring officer.

Integrity

Commissioners should not place themselves under any financial or other obligation to individuals or organisations that might influence the performance of their official duties.

On my appointment, I pledged my oath of impartiality and to ‘give a voice to the public, especially victims of crime’. Should the ability to do my job conflict with any disclosable or other interest known to me, I shall declare the conflict as soon as possible and take necessary action.

Objectivity

In carrying out public business, including making public appointments, awarding contracts, or recommending individuals for rewards and benefits, Commissioners should decide on merit only.

All appointments to my office have been made following an open and transparent process.

The people of North Yorkshire, play a key role on how the Police and Crime Plan is put into practice. My plan lays out how I and the Chief Constable will make the communities of North Yorkshire safer – and feel safer.

I hold public surgeries across North Yorkshire, which are open to all. These sessions are routinely advertised online, in the press and by posters in local shops and buildings. Arrangements for attending can also be made through the Office of the Police and Crime Commissioner.

Accountability

Commissioners are accountable to the public for their decisions and actions and must cooperate with all appropriate scrutiny.

The strategic decisions I make are published on my website as decision notices, which are an ongoing record of the reasons and development of policing services. In every one, I confirm that I have considered whether or not I have any personal or prejudicial interest.

I have established an Executive Board, which allows both the Chief Constable and I to exercise our respective roles transparently, with all meeting minutes published. This promotes openness and lets the public know about developments within the force.

I also talk to you on decisions of particular public interest, such as firearms licensing and road safety, with many routes open for challenge and feedback, e.g. surgeries, meetings and web chats.

Openness

Commissioners should be as open as possible about all the decisions and actions they take. They should explain all decisions and withhold information only where it is clearly in the wider public interest.

My website complies with the Local Policing Bodies (Specified Information Order) 2011 as far as is possible. There is a range of information accessible there, including confidential reporting policy and disclosure. It also publishes the most up-to-date performance information for North Yorkshire Police, which is updated every month.

I keep my communities informed through social media and public engagements. My office issues regular press releases about work done and responds rapidly to other media enquiries.

Honesty

Commissioners must declare any private interests relating to their public duties and resolve any conflicts in a way that protects the public interest.

I act solely in the public interest whilst fulfilling my job. My website is accessible to you, the public and I openly publish a register of disclosable interests. I have no outside interests, as shown in that document.

Leadership

Commissioners should promote leadership and demonstrate support for the Nolan principles in their own behaviour. They should actively promote and robustly support the principles and be willing to challenge poor behaviour wherever it occurs.

By establishing clearer and more transparent terms for senior officers, I have reduced costs for the taxpayer and set an example to the police force. I ensure full public accountability, so anyone can check my progress and that of my office.