Mental health – improving services

The following services have been commissioned to reduce demand on the force in relation to first time and repeat offending and calls for public safety and welfare:

Mental health street triage services

The primary aims of Street Triage are:

  • To reduce the use of Section 136 of the Mental Health Act
  • To reduce the amount of police resources devoted to dealing with mental health incidents
  • To improve the speed and appropriateness of assessment, care and treatment provided to individuals in mental health crisis – including referral into other services and follow-up care

These aims are delivered by having Mental Health staff available on a face to face basis to support Police Officers on the ground when they are faced with a member of the public in mental health crisis.

Scarborough Street Triage 

The Scarborough Mental Health Street Triage service was one of nine Department of Health funded pilots announced in 2013 by Home Secretary Teresa May and Minister for Care and Support Norman Lamb.

The Scarborough pilot ran from 24 March 2014 to 23 March 2015 and was delivered in partnership by Tees, Esk and Wear Valleys NHS Foundation Trust and North Yorkshire Police.

The Scarborough team has now been in place for over two years with the service providing a seven day a week response, working in collaboration with North Yorkshire Police, from 12:30pm to 11:00pm.

York Street Triage

The York Mental Health Street Triage service (Vale of York CCG) provides a seven day a week response, working in collaboration with North Yorkshire Police, from 10:00am to 10:30pm.

The Police and Crime Commissioner contributed £167,000 in 2016 to support the York  and Scarborough Street Triage projects in 2016.

Force Control Room Mental Health Triage

The North Yorkshire Police Force Control Room based Mental Health Triage service works in collaboration with Force Control Room staff, Police Officers and the Health-Based Places of Safety within the county to provide timely access to advice, support and triage into the most appropriate service, using patient record access as appropriate to aid risk-based decision-making.

The control room mental health professional can also co-ordinate deployment of Street Triage or local Crisis Teams to assist, based on priority / appropriateness.

The Police and Crime Commissioner contributed £174,000 in 2016 to the force control room mental health triage.