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24 June, 2020

Significant boost for domestic abuse and sexual violence survivors in North Yorkshire

A third of a million pounds of extra money is to be invested in domestic abuse and sexual violence support services in North Yorkshire and York.

The £345,000 funding, from the Ministry of Justice, comes after Police, Fire and Crime Commissioner Julia Mulligan worked with the government to provide more help for survivors during the coronavirus pandemic.

Organisations across the county who offer support services, whether currently funded by the Commissioner or not, were invited to bid for the COVID-19 extraordinary funding and decisions have been made quickly by both the Commissioner’s team and Ministry of Justice given the urgent need.

Over £203,000 will be invested in domestic abuse support services while £141,000 will be for sexual violence support services. It can be used to address additional costs from 24 March to 31 October, such as short-term disruption to income, essential costs to sustain current activities and addressing increased demand.

Among the successful organisations are:

  • Independent Domestic Abuse Services (IDAS)
  • Community Counselling (North Yorkshire) Ltd
  • Parents Against Child Exploitation (PACE)
  • The Children’s Society’s Hand in Hand Project
  • Tees Valley Inclusion’s Halo Project

Julia Mulligan, North Yorkshire Police, Fire and Crime Commissioner, said:

“This money is urgently needed and will make a huge difference to the support available for domestic abuse and sexual violence survivors across North Yorkshire and York – services which are more in demand than ever before.

“I am pleased the Ministry of Justice have listened to my concerns, understood the challenges faced and recognised their importance in awarding a third of a million pounds.

“It will make a real difference to the help available on a front line which has been growing as a result of the coronavirus pandemic and which I fear will only continue to grow as lockdown eases.”